How Big Should My Television Be?

A TV Size Diagonal Calculator for Widescreen Television

Enter Distance To TV In Feet:
HDTV (2K) Diagonal In Inches
UHD (4K) Diagonal In Inches
Min Max


How Far Should I Sit From My Television?

A TV Distance Calculator for Widescreen Television

Enter TV Diagonal In Inches:
HDTV (2K) Distance In Feet
UHD (4K) Distance In Feet
Min Max

Television Viewing Comfort

Visual Acuity And Picture Enjoyment


These calculators are derived in part by studies done by various television and movie industry organizations such as SMPTE and THX. These recommendations are based on studies that reflect the visual acuity and comfort of the viewer with respect to the display of motion pictures in differing formats. The current trend in televison is to provide increasing amounts of detail and contrast in the displayed picture. This provides a perception of detail unparalleled in earlier television systems. This perception is only apparent when the viewer is within a given distance from the television screen.

These calculators address widescreen 16:9 ratio displays regardless of the screen composition. While modern television are capable of displaying astonishing detail, the program source may limit the quality of the picture. Old VHS video tapes are at the low end of detail. Increasing in detail are DVDs, HDTV, and UHD TV. Due to this span of program quality, the calculators suggest a television range rather than a single solution. The calculators create two boundaries at two resolutions. The first calculator requires the user to know the viewer-to-screen distance in order to determine the suggested television diagonal size. The maximum size is suggested for those viewers interested in simulating a theater experience with the exclusive use of either 2k for HDTV sets or 4k programming for UHD sets. The minimum size is suggested for those viewers who want the ability to enjoy a library of lower resolution programming - VHS tapes for HDTV sets and HDTV programming for UHD sets. The second calculator requires the viewer to know the diagonal size of the televison in order to determine the proper distance to sit from the screen. The minimum distance is suggested for those viewers interested in simulating a theater experience while the maximum distance is suggested for those viewers who want the ability to enjoy a library of lower resolution programming.

These calculators only create a "rule of thumb". The comfort zone for any given viewer may likely exist somewhere between the calculated boundaries.


Television Programmers and Resellers


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    Program Resellers A to Z

Television Glossary

Listed below are terms used in the various segments of the television industry. In order to be concise, the definitions are in one sentence consisting. Complex concepts may require the reader to seek further explanation.


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    0-9

2k

  • An approximation of the 1920 horizontal lines of resolution in consumer high definition televisions.

4k

  • An approximation of the 4,096 horizontal lines of resolution in professional filmmaking though also sometimes referenced to the 3,840 horizontal lines of resolution in consumer UHD televisions.

720P

  • The lowest number of lines of vertical resolution in a high definition television system that are progressively displayed to create one complete picture frame.

1080I

  • The number of lines of vertical resolution in a high definition television system after two overlapping half resolution fields are alternately displayed to create an interlaced picture frame.

1080P

  • The highest number of lines of vertical resolution in a high definition television system that are progressively displayed to create one complete picture frame.

    A

Active

  • A powered electronic device that alters in some way the signal presented to it.

Aerial

  • An antenna, or in cable broadband, it is a reference to plant facilities hung on poles.

AFC

  • Automatic Frequency Control

Agile

  • A device capable of user frequency selection as opposed to being fixed in frequency.

AGC

  • Automatic Gain Control

AM

  • Amplitude Modulation

AML

  • Amplitude Modulated Link

Amplifier

  • A device used to increase the strength of the signal supplied to it.

Analog

  • A descriptor for quantities varying continuously rather than in discrete steps.

Anchor

  • In aerial tower or cable construction, it is a buried metal structure to which guy wires are tied.

Antenna

  • A device designed to collect or emit electromagnetic energy.

APL

  • Average Picture Level

Array

  • An arrangement of antenna elements or antennas for increasing the strength of desired signals while reducing the strength of undesired signals.

ATSC

ASC

  • Automatic Slope Control

Aspect Ratio

  • Picture width to height (4:3 for standard televison and 16:9 for high definition television).

Attenuation

  • The loss of signal through transmission often expressed in decibels.

Attenuator

  • A device that is used to weaken the strength of the signal supplied to it.

Audio

  • A reference to electronically reproduced sound or the equipment processing it.

Aural Carrier

  • In analog television, the portion of channel radio energy carrying the sound.

    B

Back Porch

  • A reference to that part of the video signal immediately following the horizontal sync pulse.

Bandpass Filter

  • A device that passes a range of frequencies while blocking frequencies outside that range.

Bandwidth

  • The useable range of frequencies of a given device or system.

Baseband

  • The originating signal information before it is modulated onto a radio frequency carrier.

Beamwidth

  • The angular width at which an antenna's receive or transmit capability drops to half power.

Beats

  • Undesired sum and difference frequency products created in an electronic device from two or more signals which can interfere with the desired signal.

Blacker-than-Black

  • Below reference black level (sync pulse direction) in a composite video signal.

Black Level

  • The brightness of black (peak) in a video signal (referenced in NTSC as 7.5 IRE).

Blanking

  • That part of the video signal where the amplitude and timing renders retrace as invisible.

Block Converter

  • A device that shifts a group of frequencies to a higher or lower grouping.

Block Tilt

  • Tilt in broadband plant achieved by stepped signal levels of groups of frequencies.

Breezeway

  • That part of the video signal between the sync pulse and the color burst.

Bridger

  • In cable broadband, it is the amplifier that is fed from the trunk and, in turn, feeds the distribution plant.

Broadband

  • In general, a large frequency capacity electronic device; in particular, a closed large capacity interactive electronic distribution system of multiple services to subscribers.

Broadcast

  • An open, limited frequency capacity electronic transmission serving the public.

    C

C-Band

  • A satellite delivery system using a 3.7 - 4.2 GHz downlink.

Cable Modem

  • A device used at the subscriber household to receive and transfer data at high speeds.

CARS

  • Community Antenna Relay Service and Community Antenna Relay Station.

CATV

  • Community Antenna Television; more commonly known as cable television.

Carrier or Carrier Wave

  • An electromagnetic wave that is dynamically altered in order to convey intelligence.

Cascade

  • Two or more amplifiers used in series to perpetuate an electronic signal.

CLI

  • Cumulative Leakage Index

Coaxial Cable

  • A broadband cable with a center conductor, insulating dielectric, and an outer shield.

Color Burst

  • In NTSC, a few cycles of the 3.58MHz color subcarrier imposed on the composite video signal back porch as a reference.

Co-Channel Interference

  • Interference created on a channel by a distant channel on the same frequency.

Combiner

  • A isolating passive device used to combine differing channel outputs into a single output.

Component Video

  • An analog video signal transmission system consisting of one luminance channel and two color channels.

Composite Video

  • An analog video signal transmission system consisting of blanking, synchronization, luminance, and color information all in one channel.

Converter

  • In cable broadband, this is a frequency changing device of which the most commonly known version is the customer set-top box.

Core Shrink-back

  • When the center conductor of a coaxial cable or the entire cable itself pulls out of a connector due to temperature related contraction, also known a "suckout".

Cross Modulation

  • A type of distortion where modulation from a channel or channels is superimposed onto another channel when they pass through a non-linear circuit.

CRT

  • Cathode Ray Tube

Cycle

  • A complete change in a waveform from zero to a negative peak to zero, then to a positive peak and back to zero.

    D

dB

  • Decibel, a unit relating the ratio of two signal levels using a logarithmic scale.

dBm

  • Decibel Milliwatt.

dBmV

  • Decibel Millivolt.

DBS

  • Direct Broadcast Satellite.

dBW

  • Decibel Watt.

Demodulator

  • An electronic device used to remove the intelligence riding a carrier wave so that it may be displayed or processed.

Diplexer

  • In broadband, a device that combines or splits differing frequency carriers.

Dipole

  • A one-half wavelength center fed antenna consisting of two radiating elements.

Direct Pickup

  • Undesired broadcast station ingress from the air and into the cable television system or customer equipment

Directional Coupler

  • A passive device used to divide signals with the "through" port experiencing minimum loss, the "tap" port having a greater specified loss, and a high isolation loss between these ports.

Dish

  • A reference to a parabolic antenna commonly designed for use at microwave frequencies.

Distortion

  • Undesired changes in a signal waveform caused by the inherent nonlinearities of active devices and other processing elements of the transmission system.

Distant Signal

  • A television broadcast signal that is received outside of its Grade B contour.

DLP

  • Digital Light Processing

DOCSIS

Downlink

  • The signal transmission from a satellite to an earth station.

Downstream

  • The signal flow direction in a CATV system when it travels from the headend to the service subscriber.

Drop

  • The cable line connecting the subscriber household to the distribution plant of their broadband services supplier.

    E

Earth Station

  • The antenna and associated electronic equipment needed for satellite communications.

Effective Height

  • The height of a antenna from ground in terms of its center of radiation rather than its physical location.

ERP

  • Effective Radiated Power

Egress

  • In cable broadband, it is the undesired leakage of signals from the plant into the air.

EIA

  • Electronics Industries Association

Electrical Length

  • In regard to performance, it is the effective length of an electrical device such as an antenna or transmission line (often expressed in wavelengths) rather than the physical length.

Electromagnetic Spectrum

  • The entire range of frequencies at which energy may be electromagnetically radiated which includes everything from subaudible frequencies to gamma ray frequencies.

Encoder

  • A device used to alter a signal so that it cannot be readily used unless another device (decoder) is authorized to do so.

Encryption

  • The act of applying algorithms or coding to information so that it cannot be used without the proper "keys" to do so.

Equalization

  • The application of frequency response devices to an electronic system to compensate for the frequency related losses of that system.

Equalizer

  • In cable broadband, a passive device designed with a frequency response tilt opposite of the inherent response tilt in the cable that precedes it.

    F

FDM

  • Frequency Division Multiplexing

Feeder Cables

  • In a cable broadband system, it is the intermediate lines of distribution that carry the signals from the main trunk lines to the subscriber lines.

Field

  • One-half of a complete frame of video with each half being composed of either odd or even scan lines.

Field Strength

  • Also known as Field Intensity, it is the strength of a radio wave at a given point.

Filter

  • A passive device used to shape, pass,or block the frequency response of the signal fed to it.

Flooding Compound

  • A viscous material placed within a cable to guard against water infiltration.

FM

  • Frequency Modulation

Footcandle

  • A measurement unit of illumination where 1 lumen is equally distributed across 1 square foot.

Footprint

  • The area of earth covered by a satellites directed beam.

Forward Direction

  • In cable broadband, the direction of signal flow from the headend to the subscriber.

Frame

  • A single complete video picture composed of the odd scan line field and the even scan line field interlaced together.

Franchise

  • Legal authorization issued by the local governing body (usually city, but can be county or state) to build and operate a cable television system in that jurisdiction.

Frequency

  • The cycles-per-second count of a given audio or radio wave

Frequency Response

  • The signal amplitude gain/loss across the frequency bandwidth of a given device or transmission system.

Frequency Suckout

  • A sharp signal loss or notch within a device or system's passband.

FSK

  • Frequency Shift Keying

Front Porch

  • The part of the video synchronization signal that follows the picture information and precedes the horizontal sync pulse.

Funny Paper Effect

  • The misregistration seen on video when the chrominance information either leads or lags the luminance information.

    G

Gain

  • Usually expressed in decibels, it is the increase in signal strength through an amplifying device when comparing the output value to the input value.

Geostationary

  • A satellite that is in an orbit that allows travel that is synchronized with the earth's rotation, thus creating a constant "stationary" relationship.

Geosynchronous

  • See "Geostationary".

Group Delay

  • The difference in transmission time between frequency elements passing through an electronic device or medium.

Guard Band

  • Radio frequency spectrum left unused between channels in order to avoid interference.

    H

Harmonic Distortion

  • Unwanted frequency multiples of the frequency fundamental(s) that are generated due to the nonlinearities of an electronic device.

HDMI

  • High Definition Multimedia Interface

HDTV

  • High Definition Television

Headend

  • The central electronics facility of a cable broadband system where all signal sources are generated, gathered, processed, combined, and fed into the trunking/distribution system.

Heterodyne

  • To electronically mix two frequencies together in a nonlinear device in order to produce two new frequencies equal to the sum and difference of the originating frequencies.

High Band

  • The band of frequencies covering 174MHz to 216MHz where channels 7 to 13 reside.

High Pass Filter

  • A filter that attenuates all frequencies below a designated cutoff point and passes all frequencies above that point

Home Theater

  • A recreation of the cinema experience in the home that can range from simple multichannel sound and large screen enhancements to the construction of theater staging and seating.

HRC

  • Harmonically Related Carriers

Hub

  • A signal processing facility located between the headend and the signal distribution system in order to provide customized regional services.

Hue

  • The dominant optical wavelength that causes visual perception to distinguish a particular color apart from others.

Hum

  • In audio, it is a low pitched interference tone often picked up from AC power sources, while in cable broadband it is often a reference to visual Hum Modulation.

Hum Modulation

  • The undesired modulation of the visual carrier by power line frequencies and harmonics (or other low frequency disturbances) sometimes visible as bars rolling through the picture.

Hyperband

  • For CATV, the band of frequencies above 300MHz.

Hz

  • Hertz, a measure of frequency known formerly as "cps" or "cycles-per-second" but renamed in honor of Heinrich Rudolph Hertz who furthered the understanding of electromagnetic waves.

    I

IF

  • Intermediate Frequency

Impedance

  • The total resistive and reactive opposition to the flow of an alternating current signal at a given frequency.

Impulse Noise

  • Short duration transient disturbances.

Inductor

  • A coiled conductor designed to oppose changes in current by virtue of its concentrated magnetic field.

Infrared

  • The section of electromagnetic spectrum just below visible light.

Ingress

  • The undesired influx of interference into a cable broadband system from sources outside of the system.

Interlace

  • A method of constructing one frame of a televison picture by first displaying a field of odd numbered video scan lines, then then displaying the even numbered scan lines while relying on persistence of vision to complete their joining.

IRC

  • Incrementally Related Carriers

Isolation

  • The attribute of a device that minimizes signal transfer from one point to an inappropriate point.

    J

Jitter

  • An unstable picture usually caused by disturbances to synchronization.

Jumper Cable

  • In cable broadband, it is a short length of coaxial cable used to connect close proximity devices such as a converter box and the customer television.

    K

Ku Band

  • The band of microwave frequencies extending from 12 to 18GHz (in North America, the reference commonly refers to the 11.7 to 12.2GHZ satellite downlink portion).

    L

LASER

  • Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation

Lasher

  • A machine used in aerial construction to tie the communications lines to the support strand by spin-wrapping wire around the cable bundle.

LCD

  • Liquid Crystal Display

LCoS

  • Liquid Crystal on Silicon

Leakage

  • Undesired signal emissions from a cable broadband system (often from cable cracks or poor connections) into the air.

LED

  • Light Emitting Diode

Line Extender

  • An amplifier used in the distribution system of cable broadband to extend the reach of the signal.

Line-of-Sight

  • An unobstructed path through open space intended for transmit/receive stations such as point-to-point microwave, satellite-to-earth transmissions, and optical laser links.

LNA

  • Low Noise Amplifier

LNB

  • Low Noise Block Converter

LNC

Low Band

  • The band of frequencies covering 54MHz to 88MHz where channels 2 to 6 reside.
  • Low Noise Converter

Local Origination

  • Programming produced and telecast from the local cable broadband provider.

Local Oscillator

  • The oscillator in superheterodyned equipment that generates the proper frequency signal needed to mix with the received signal to produce the desired intermediate frequency.

Local Signals

  • Television broadcast signals received within their respective Grade B contours.

Log Periodic Antenna

  • A directional antenna with the radiating elements and spacing arranged in logarithmically increasing dimensions in order to provide wideband reception or transmission.

Low Pass Filter

  • A filter that attenuates all frequencies above a designated cutoff point and passes all frequencies below that point

Lumen

  • The unit of light flux from a point source of one candle through a unit solid angle.

Luminance Signal

  • The part of the television signal that carries the brightness information and can produce a complete monochromatic picture.

    M

Makeready

  • The process in cable broadband where the readiness of underground and poleline facilities are ensured prior to construction.

MATV

  • Master Antenna Television System

MDS

  • Multipoint Distribution System

MCR

  • Master Control Room

Messenger

  • Refers to either the supporting steel strand to which hardline coaxial cable may be lashed or the supporting steel wire embedded in the jacket of aerial coaxial drop cable.

Microwave

  • A reference to those radio waves with a frequency above 1000MHz.

Mid Band

  • The band of frequencies covering 120MHz to 174MHz where cable television channels 14 to 22 (A to I) reside.

Midspan

  • A point on the strand and coaxial distribution cables located between two utility poles.

MMDS

  • Multichannel Multipoint Distribution

Modulate

  • To alter a constant carrier wave's amplitude, frequency or phase by impressing a varying intelligence wave onto it.

Modulation

  • The electronic process used to impress intelligence onto a carrier wave for transportation to a distant recovery location.

Monitor

  • A term usually applied to a television, a speaker, or other studio equipment used in observing the quality of signal and can also apply to the act of observance itself.

MTS

  • Multichannel Television Sound

    N

NAB

  • National Association of Broadcasters

NCTA

  • National Cable Television Association

Noise

  • Random electron movement in an electronic circuit that influences the desired signal passing in that circuit.

Noise Figure

  • The expected amount of noise in decibels added by a given electronic signal processing circuit.

Noise Temperature

  • A noise contribution rating derived by positing the temperature of a resistor connected to an ideal amplifier compared to the actual amplifier were it connected to a resistor at 0K.

Notch Filter

  • A filter designed to pass all frequencies except for that at which it is tuned to attenuate.

NTC-7

  • Network Transmission Committee guidelines for the placement of test signals in the vertical interval of an NTSC television signal for testing transmission performance.

NTSC

  • National Television System Committee

    O

Off-air

  • Used interchangeably with the term "off-the-air", it denotes signal reception taken off an antenna after passing through the air.

Operating Power

  • From the viewpoint of a transmitting antenna, it is the actual power supplied to it.

Optical Fiber

  • A glass or plastic fiber designed to propagate light for the purpose of information transmittal.

Oscilloscope

  • An electronic testing device designed to graphically display changes in voltage with respect to the passage of time.

    P

Pan

  • A slow horizontal movement of a camera while restricting vertical movement.

Parabolic Dish Antenna

  • A center fed high gain antenna with a parabola derived dish shape that is used for satellite, microwave, and other short wavelength electromagnetic communications signals.

Passband

  • A band of frequency spectrum typically defined by half power boundaries that is allowed to pass through a device that attenuates the remainder of the spectrum.

Passive

  • A non-powered electronic device that alters in some way the signal presented to it.

PPV

  • Pay-Per-View

PCM

  • Pulse Code Modulation

Peak-to-Peak

  • The measurement of a varying electrical signal from its highest amplitude excursion to its lowest excursion.

PEP

  • Peak Envelope Power

PLL

  • Phase Lock Loop; Phase Locked Loop

Pilot Carrier

  • In CATV, it refers to the carrier waves used as references by system devices to allow automatic compensation adjustments of carrier amplitudes either equally or by relative frequency.

Pixel

  • A "picture element" which is the smallest point of a raster image.

Preamplifier

  • A low noise amplifier designed to precede another amplifier.

Pressure Tap

  • From historic CATV, it was a obsolete device used to tap the distribution cables without completely cutting the line when installing a customer drop line at a new location.

Propagation

  • The act of an electromagnetic wave traveling through space or a medium.

PSA

  • Public Service Announcement

Public Access Channel

  • Government mandated television channel space granted by a cable television company for public use by citizen programmers.

    Q

QAM

  • Quadrature Amplitude Modulation

    R

Radiator

  • The element of an antenna fed by signal line so it may propagate an electromagnetic signal.

Radio Frequency

  • The band of electromagnetic spectrum that today stretches from 3 KHz to 300 GHz.

Random Noise

  • Molecular activity in a material that generates non-coherent electrical disturbances.

Raster

  • A pattern of scan lines (analog) or pixels (digital) that form a picture on a display device.

Rectifier

  • An electronic device that converts alternating current into direct current.

Resolution

  • The amount of detail that can be seen on a television screen as described by the number of distinct lines that can be resolved.

Return Loss

  • The ratio of reflected power to transmitted power in decibels for a given device inserted into a transmission line..

Ring Network

  • A closed communications loop where each node of the loop is connected to two other nodes.

RMS

  • Root Mean Square

Roll-off

  • A term used to describe a steepness of loss of signal vs frequency at the passband edges of a circuit or transmission system.

    S

SAP

  • Secondary Audio Program

Satellite

  • In communications, it is a spacecraft that orbits the earth to relay signals over great distances from one location to another.

SAW filter

  • Surface Acoustic Wave filter

SBE

  • Society of Broadcast Engineers

SCA

  • Subsidiary Communications Authority

Scramble

  • In pay television, it is a method of disrupting the presentation of programming except for paying customers.

SCTE

  • Society of Cable and Telecommunications Engineers

Second Harmonic

  • A signal generated at twice the frequency of its originating fundamental frequency.

Second Order Beat

  • A distortion product created by the mixing of two signals due to the non-linearities of an electronic device.

Sheath Current

  • Improper electrical energy that travels on the shield of a coaxial cable.

Sidebands

  • Lower and upper frequency bands of energy created by the modulation of a carrier wave.

Signal Leakage

  • In CATV, it is the electronic signals that escape from the confines of the closed system and into the air.

Signal-to-Noise Ratio

  • It is the ratio measured in decibels of desired signal to undesired background noise.

Sine Squared Pulse

  • It is a video test signal used in bandwidth limited systems to evaluate performance issues such as chrominance to luminance errors.

Single Channel Antenna

  • An antenna with elements designed primarily for one channel of interest rather than a band of channels.

SLM

  • Signal Level Meter

Slope

  • In CATV, it is the change in gain with respect to frequency across the bandwidth of the system.

SMATV

  • Satellite Master Antenna Television

SMPTE

  • Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers

Spectrum Analyzer

  • An electronic device which reveals the graphical dispersion of energy in a display of frequency vs amplitude.

Splitter

  • A device that divides the electronic signal at it input to allow more than one output.

Spurious Signals

  • Undesired signal energy present at any frequency at the output of a device that was not present at the input.

SRL

  • Structural Return Loss

Stacked Array

  • In communications, it refers to a stacked antenna array which is a group of antennas physically arranged and connected to increase gain and directivity.

Standby Power Supply

  • In CATV, it is a step-down transformer with a battery backup meant to power the electronic devices in the branches of the system.

Star Network

  • A network where a central node processes communication between all other nodes.

STL

  • Studio-to-Transmitter

Strand

  • The steel wire used to support the coaxial cable in CATV and other closed communication systems.

Strip Amplifier

  • A single channel amplifier used by MATV systems and small CATV systems to stabilize broadcast channels before placing them in the system.

Studio

  • A facility designed to enable the creation of audio and/or video productions.

Sub Band

  • The band of frequencies in the 5MHz to 50MHz range where cable television channels T7 to T13 reside and is typically used for reverse or upstream signals.

Subcarrier

  • A carrier wave, itself modulated with intelligence, that is modulated onto another carrier.

STV

  • Subscription Television

SCA

  • Subsidiary Communications Authority

Super Band

  • The band of frequencies in the 216MHz 300MHz range where cable television channels 23 to 36 (J to W) reside.

Superheterodyne

  • A common circuit in receivers today that mix the incoming signal with a locally generated one to create a more easily processed intermediate signal.

S-Video

  • An analog video signal transmission system consisting of one luminance channel and one color channel.

Sync

  • It is abbreviation for the synchronization signal used to lock the timing of the scanned video to allow a picture be recreated on a television screen.

    T

Tap

  • A passive electronic device placed in the distribution lines of a cable television system to feed signal to the household drop line.

TASO

  • Television Allocation Study Organization

TBC

  • Time Base Corrector

Teleconference

  • A meeting where the presence of participants at different locations are brought together virtually by audio and video.

Television

  • An electronic device capable of displaying realtime or recorded moving pictures and sound from distant or nearby sources.

Terminal Isolation

  • In CATV, it is the attenuation in decibels between the subscriber's terminal and another terminal in the system.

Terminator

  • An impedance matched device used to terminate a CATV port.

Thermal Equalizer

  • A electronic device used in a cable television system to compensate for changes in line loss during varied temperatures.

Third Harmonic

  • A signal generated at three times the frequency of its originating fundamental frequency.

Third Order Beat

  • A distortion product created by the mixing of three signals due to the non-linearities of an electronic device.

Tilt

  • In CATV, it is the difference in amplifier gain or cable loss between the lower passband edge and the upper passband edge.

TDM

  • Time Division Multiplexing

TDR

  • Time Domain Reflectometer; a device that provides a pulse to a line under test and allows the reflected pulse to be graded in amplitude and distance on a graphical display.

Transponder

  • That part of a satellite that relays communications to and from earth stations.

Trap

  • An electronic filter used at cable television subscriber taps to prevent passage of certain channels.

Traveling-wave Tube

  • A high power amplifying tube used in microwave applications.

Triple Beat

  • A distortion product created by the mixing of three signals due to the non-linearities of an electronic device.

Trunk Amplifier

  • In CATV, it is an amplifier used in the main trunk lines to compensate for line loss.

TVRO

  • Television Receive Only; a reference to a satellite earth station that receives satellite signals, but cannot transmit to it.

Twinlead

  • An obsolete form of television wiring that is composed of two parallel wires and insulation jacket in a flat ribbon form.

Two-way

  • A reference to a cable system that not only sends signals into the system, but receives them as well.

    U

UHD

  • Ultra High Definition

UHF

  • Ultra High Frequency

Uplink

  • A communications transmission from an earth station to a satellite

Upstream

  • The signal flow direction in a CATV system when it travels from the service subscriber to the headend.

    V

VCR

  • Video Cassette Recorder

Vectorscope

  • A specialized test instrument designed to check gain and phase of a chrominance signal.

Velocity of Propagation

  • The speed of a signal transmission in a medium relative to the speed of light in a vacuum.

VBI

  • Vertical Blanking Interval

VITS

  • Vertical Interval Test Signals

Vestigial Sideband

  • An amplitude modulated carrier with one sideband truncated to improve power efficiency.

VHF

  • Very High Frequency

VHS

  • Video Home System

Visual Carrier

  • In television, it is the carrier modulated with the luminance information

VTR

  • Video Tape Recorder

VSWR

  • Voltage Standing Wave Ratio

VU

  • Volume Unit

    W

Waveform Monitor

  • A specialized test instrument designed to check various video waveform levels with respect to time.

Wavelength

  • Inversely proportional to its frequency, it is the distance traveled by a sinusoidal wave when it completes one complete cycle.

White Clipper

  • A video circuit designed to prevent excessive video levels from generating interference on the audio portion of the television signal.

    XYZ

Yagi

  • A directional antenna commonly composed of a dipole, a parasitic reflector, and one or more parasitic directors.

Zoom

  • A term used to denote the ability to adjust the lens angle of view to change the perceived distance to the subject matter.

About Television Tutor

TelevisionTutor was written to aid those seeking to explore the subject of television. The author of this site, George Stantial, has endeavored to create a place where his background can serve the reader in some small way.


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